News

Here we will highlight relevant articles in English covering research relevant to the Arctic/High North. For more articles (in Norwegian), please refer to the Norwegian pages.

Published Jan. 10, 2019 11:11 AM

The University of Oslo and the Scandinavian Institute of Maritime Law has concluded an agreement with Equinor in the field of climate and energy law.

Greenland is the largest island on Earth. In central Greenland researchers have located a corridor with thinned-out landmasses running from east to west, which they explain by Greenland drifting over a stationary hotspot. The thin lithosphere assisted volcanic activities across Greenland 60 million years ago. Illustration photo: Colourbox.no
Published Nov. 16, 2018 3:20 PM

Volcanic activity primarily focuses at plate boundaries on Earth. But volcanoes can also form far away from plate boundaries due to plumes of hot material rising from the Earth’s deep interior. Eventually this material reaches the surface and breaks through the Earth’s crust to form a volcano – a so-called “hotspot”. Scientists now present a theory of how this type of hotspot activity can explain massive, past volcanic eruptions in Greenland and in the North Atlantic.

According to a new study is the global sea level rising faster than previously thought. The accelerating sea level will have impact on coastlines around the world.  Several of the World’s largest cities are near a coastline, here New York. For others see U.N. Atlas of the Oceans.  Illustration photo: Colourbox.com
Published June 22, 2017 9:05 PM

Across the globe, sea level has been rising for decades, but we don’t know how fast. Researchers have now analyzed tide gauge data and reconstructed global mean sea level since 1902. Their record yields a slower average rise before 1990 than previously thought, but similar high rates of about 3.1 mm/yr as observed from independent satellite observations from 1993-2012. This suggests that global mean sea level has been accelerating much faster than previously assumed in the past two decades.

The Earth: 'Blue Marble' NASA. See animation. Image (and animation): John Nelson (IDV Solutions).
Published Apr. 26, 2017 12:03 PM

A warming Arctic will give an extended growing season particularly due to an earlier spring, and it has been believed that this will give a greater uptake of CO2 in plants and an increased carbon sink. An impact potentially offsetting some of the anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. A new study suggest that the “warmer spring, bigger sink” hypothesis may no longer hold.

Published Nov. 2, 2016 12:17 PM

Anthrax broke out in Russia this summer, but why? Because the permafrost in Siberia is melting. At the same time, people in Nord-Troms fear a tsunami and enormous devastation when the permafrost on Nordnesfjellet mountain melts and the mountain cracks. Read more on siu.no

Ice-cores and data about sulfate flux over Greenland and Artica tell us more about the climate in the past. Photo: Michael Sigl
Published Apr. 19, 2016 11:30 AM

International team of climate researchers reconstructs global cooling in the reign of the Roman emperor Justinian. Ice-cores and data about sulfate flux at Greenland and Artica reveils the pasts climate disasters. Their research presented at EGU 2016; Vienna recently.

50 METRES HIGH: Most glaciers in the world are classic calving glaciers, like the Lilliehöök glacier in Northern Svalbard. Its front is to kilometers wide and almost 50 metres high. Every time it calves, huge roars can be heard across the fjord. The researchers have now examined another type of glaciers that behave very differently. Photo: Yngve Vogt
Published Feb. 2, 2016 9:32 AM

Many glaciers on Svalbard behave very differently from other glaciers worldwide. They advance massively for some years and then quickly retreat – and then remain quiescent for fifty to a hundred years – before they once again start to advance.