Organ on a chip and nano-devices (CHIP)

The convergence environment will develop an “Organ on a chip” interface. This will provide a powerful new platform for understanding and testing of physiological functions and therapeutic interventions.

Consortium (from left to right)
Stefan Krauss, Professor, Department of Molecular Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Oslo University Hospital (OUS) (leader)
Ørjan G. Martinsen, Professor, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences
Philipp Häfliger, Professor, Department of Informatics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences
Ola Nilsen, Professor, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences
Steven Wilson, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences
Gareth Sullivan, Researcher, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine

Objectives

Primary objective

  • To create an engaging, interactive, scientific environment that develops and tests miniaturized sensor and detection systems to monitor miniaturized organ system on an “Organ on a chip” platform

Secondary objectives

  • To develop liver organoids with integrated nano-needle sensors
  • To develop Confocal Raman spectroscopy scanning protocols for liver organoids
  • To develop islet organoids with integrated wireless sensor devices
  • To develop an organ on a chip integrated miniaturized mass spec system
  • To develop a high resolution (Impedance) sensing platform unit for “organ on a chip”
  • To create a creative bowl for students, research groups and innovative industry at the interface between living systems and machines (in collaboration with MESH)
  • To create a public media format that follows the project (in collaboration with NRK)

Summary

Releasing the complexity of biological interactions or organs from the constraints of an animal / human body will enable a plethora of analytical possibilities. An emerging platform that would allow this is “Organ on a chip” technology, whereby functional organ units are organized on a microfluidic platform allowing both real time manipulations and functional readouts.

The unique ability to dissect the role of functional units of human organs and their systemic connection on an “Organ on a chip” interface will provide a powerful new platform for understanding and testing physiological functions and therapeutic interventions.

“Organ on a chip” technology is in its infancy, but is predicted to have a game changing impact on drug development and validation, nano-device development, as well as personalization of therapeutic reagents.

Reflecting this potential, the world economic forum has listed in 2016 “Organ on a chip” as one of the 10 emerging technologies that have the potential to improve lives and transform industries.

“Organ on a chip” development requires flexible integration of complex and rapidly emerging monitoring and imaging technologies. Here we propose to develop “platform” technologies that allow the integration of organoid development, miniaturized detection, sensor technology, and imaging tools on a microfluidic platform.

The devices will be an integral part of an emerging international open source organ on a chip platform that is being developed in collaboration with international experts in the frame of a center of excellence.

The integrated technology platforms could form a crystallization point for technology development within the interface between life sciences and nano-technology in Norway.

Note

Krauss also received funding for a Centre of Excellence (CoE) from the Research council of Norway recently. With the support from UiO:Life Science the CoE will be able to expand with more disciplines such as physics and chemistry.

Other close collaborators in the Centre of Excellence

  • Hanne Scholz, Division of surgery, inflammatory medicine and transplantation, OUS
  • Simon Rayner, Division laboratory medicine, OUS
Published May 2, 2017 3:33 PM - Last modified Nov. 17, 2017 2:42 PM