This course is discontinued

Pensum/læringskrav

For this course we will study four literary texts that testify to the diversity of the early novel and which in very different ways contributed to the development of the genre:

  • Aphra Behn, Oroonoko (1688)
  • Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe (1719)
  • Samuel Richardson, Pamela (1740-41)
  • Henry Fielding, Joseph Andrews (1742)
  • Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813)

Articles in Compendium (Available from Kopiutsalget, Akademika, at the beginning of term):

  • Campbell, Jill. 1995. “The Meaning of a Male Pamela.” Natural Masques, Gender and Identity in Fielding`s Plays and Novels. California: Stanford University Press. 67-89 and notes 269-274.
  • Hall, Stuart. 1996. “Ch.6: Cultural Identity and Diaspora.” Contemporary Postcolonial Theory: A Reader. Ed. Padmini Mongia. Hodder Headline Group. 110-121.
  • Hunter, Paul J. 1995. “What was New About the Novel?” Before Novels: The Cultural Contexts of Eighteenth Century English Fiction. London: W.W. Norton. 3–28 and notes 357-361.
  • McKeon, Michael. 2000. “Ch 15: Generic Transformation and Social Change: Rethinking the Rise of the Novel.” Theory of the Novel, A Historic Approach. Ed. Michael McKeon. London: Johns Hopkins University Press. 382-399.
  • McKeon, Michael. 2002. “Histories of the Individual.” The Origins of the English Novel, 1600-1740. London: Johns Hopkins University Press. 90-128 and notes 445-456.
  • Phillips, Richard. 1999. “The Geography of Robinson Crusoe.” Postcolonial Theory and English Literature, A Reader. Ed. Peter Childs. Edinburgh. Edinburgh University Press. 120-127.
  • Watt, Ian. 2000. “Ch.14: From the Rise of the Novel: Studies in Defoe, Richardson and Fielding.” Theory of the Novel, A Historic Approach. Ed. Michael McKeon. London: Johns Hopkins University Press. 363-381.
 

Published Apr. 8, 2010 4:12 PM - Last modified Sep. 1, 2010 3:51 PM