This course is discontinued

UV9353 – Modelling and measuring mathematical competence

Course content

The aim of this PhD course is to study different definitions of mathematical competence and how it is operationalized in research. Mathematical competence should be understood broadly, and to include knowledge, skills, application as well as beliefs and attitudes. Still, the focus will be on student’s mathematical competence, not teachers.

Learning outcome

In addition to four distinguished lectures provided by our guest lecturers, there will be two plenary discussions and opportunities to discuss key issues arising from the course literature. Participants are encouraged to present some aspect of their own research or to bring an issue related to the course theme forward for a plenary discussion.

Admission

Deadline for registration: 8. november

Teaching

In addition to four distinguished lectures provided by our guest lecturers, there will be two plenary discussions and opportunities to discuss key issues arising from the course literature. Participants are encouraged to present some aspect of their own research or to bring an issue related to the course theme forward for a plenary discussion.

Time and place

  • Nov. 24,  0900 – 1600, Georg Sverdrup’s house, undervisningsrom 1
  • Nov 25., 0900 – 1600, Niels Henrik Abel’s house, undervisningsrom UE26
  • Nov 26., 0900 – 1600, Niels Henrik Abel’s house, undervisningsrom UE32

Duration: 18 timer

Lecturers

  • Professor Jeremy Kilpatrick, University of Georgia,US
  • Professor Mogens Niss, Roskilde University, Denmark
  • Principal research fellow Ross Turner, ACER, Australia
  • Senior Lecturer Torgeir Onstad, University of Oslo, Norway.

Plenary lectures:

  • Jeremy Kilpatrick: Constructing and Using a Framework for Mathematical Proficiency
  • Mogens Niss: Mathematical literacy
  • Ross Turner: Assessing mathematical competencies
  • Torgeir Onstad: On the TIMSS frameworks: Construction, applications, reflections.

Plenary discussions:

  • Operationalizing
  • Modelling and measuring mathematical competence

Suggested readings:

  • Grønmo, L. S. , Lindquist, M, Arora, A, & Mullis, I. V. S. (2013). Chapter 1. TIMSS 2015 mathematics frameworkMullis, I.V.S. & Martin. M. O. (Eds.) TIMSS 2015 assessment framework. (pp. 11 – 27). To be downloaded from http://timssandpirls.bc.edu/timss2015/downloads/T15_FW_Chap1.pdf
  • Kilpatrick, J., Swafford, J., & Findell, B. (2001). Adding it up: Helping children learn mathematics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Chapters 1 and 4.
  • Kilpatrick, J.  (2014).  Competency frameworks in mathematics education.  In S. Lerman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of mathematics education (pp. 85–87).  Dordrecht, the Netherlands: Springer.
  • Lithner, J., Bergqvist, E., Bergqvist, T., Boesen, J., Palm, T., & Palmberg, B. (2010). Mathematical competencies: a research framework. In C. Bergsten (Ed.), Proceedings of Madif7  (pp. 157 – 167). SMDF.
  • National Center on Education and the Economy. (2013). What Does It Really Mean to Be College and Work Ready? The Mathematics Required of First Year Community College Students. Washington, DC: National Center on Education and the Economy. Can be downloaded from: http://www.ncee.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/NCEE_MathReport_May20131.pdf
  • Neubrand, M. (2013). PISA mathematics in Germany: Extending the conceptual framework to enable a more differentiated assessment. In M. Prenzel, M. Koberg, K. Schöps & S. Rönnebeck (Eds.), Research on PISA: Research outcomes of the PISA research conference 2009 (pp. 39-49): Springer
  • Niss, M., & Jensen, T. H. (2002). Kompetencer og matematiklæring. Ideer og inspiration til udvikling af matematikundervisning i Danmark. [Competencies and  the learning of mathematics. Ideas and inspiration for the development of mathematics education in Denmark] Copenhagen: Undervisningsminesteriet. Chapters 3, 4 and 9.
  • Niss, M., Emannuelson, G., & Nyström, P. (2013). Methods for studying Mathematics teaching and learning internationally. In M.A: Clements, A. Bishop. C. Keitel, J. Kilpatrick, & F. K. S Leung (Eds.). Third  international handbook of mathematics education. (pp. 975 – 1008). Springer.
  • Niss, M., & Jablonka, E. (2014) Mathematical Literacy. In S. Lerman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of mathematics education (pp. 391–396).  Dordrecht, the Netherlands: Springer.
  • OECD. (2013). PISA2012 Assessment and analytical framework: Mathematics, reading, science, problem solving and financial literacy.: OECD Publishing.Only the matehmatics framework – pp. 23 – 58. To be downloaded from
  • Turner, R., Dossey, J., Blum, W., & Niss, M. (2013). Using mathematical competencies to predict item difficulty in PISA: a MEG study. In M. Prenzel, M. Koberg, K. Schöps & S. Rönnebeck (Eds.), Research on PISA: Research outcomes of the PISA research conference 2009 (pp. 23-37): Springer
  • van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, M., & Becker, J. (2003). Towards a didactic model for assessment design in mathematics education. In A. J. Bishop, M. A. Clements, C. Keitel, J. Kilpatrick & F. K. S. Leung (Eds.), Second international handbook of mathematics education (pp. 689-716). Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers

Examination

To obtain 1 study point 80% attendance in the course is required.

To obtain 3 study points participants need to submit a paper on 4000 – 7000 words, which addresses a research question of topic of relevance for the course and which makes use of selected parts of the course readings. Students’ papers may be discussed in the course, and feedback will be provided by at least one of the lecturers / course leaders.

Evaluation

Facts about this course

Credits

3

Level

PhD

Teaching

Autumn 2014

Examination

80 % attendance/submission of paper

Credits: 3 credits with documentation, 1 credit without documentation

Examination

Autumn 2014

Teaching language

English