This course is discontinued

SGO9202 – Political Geographies of Citizenship

Schedule, syllabus and examination date

Choose semester

Course content

This course offers an introduction and synthesis of political geographic research and debates on citizenship. The point of departure is the centrality of citizenship as a focal point for political claims. Struggles for membership and recognition within communities of citizens, and mobilizations for citizenship rights and participation make citizenship a prism through which to address the political.

 

The course offers a geographical perspective on this politics of citizenship. While the modern model of citizenship revolves around territorial nation-states, this form of citizenship has come under pressure in the context of global transformations. Increased economic globalization has challenged the sovereignty of the state and contributed to the emergence of multi-scale forms of governance and citizenship. Global neo-liberalization of governance has transformed the meaning of citizenship, including changes in the relative importance of state, market and civil society mechanisms for achieving formal and substantive rights and participation. Moreover, increased international mobility has produced a growing number of people with dual citizenship or transnational belonging, thereby challenging the territorial model of citizenship in favour of transnational citizenship. It can thus be argued that global changes have introduced and reinforced tendencies towards multi-scale, multi-sited and transnational citizenship. Citizenship has become increasingly complex in geographic terms and the substance of membership, rights and participation has come to be defined through political claims in regard to multiple and relational scales and spaces.

 

The course will examine these political geographies of citizenship theoretically and empirically. Its starting point will be discussions about how to conceptualize politics of citizenship geographically (day 1). This will be followed by more specific investigations of key dimensions and spatialities of citizenship politics, including: (i) Mobility, belonging and active citizenship (day 2); (ii) Social movements and democratic participation (day 3), and; (iii) Workers, collective action and citizenship rights (day 4). The course schedule also includes mandatory presentations of the participants’ research projects.

Admission

The course is open for all interested Ph.D. students. Priority is given to Ph.D.-candidates in human geography enrolled at Norwegian universities.

 

PhD students at the Department of Sociology and Human Geography register for the course in StudentWeb.


Interested participants outside the Department of Sociology and Human Geography shall fill out this application form.

The deadline for registration is 1st May 2015.

Teaching

The course takes place in room 221, 2nd floor, Harriet Holters Building every day. Map here.

 

Teaching plan

Monday 18 May 2015 – Conceptualizing Citizenship Geographically

  9.15 – 10.00     Presentation of the course and the participants

10.15 – 12.00     The meaning and transformation of citizenship (Kristian Stokke)

12.00 – 13.00     Lunch

13.00 – 13.45     Conceptualizing the politics and geography of citizenship (KS)

14.00 -14.45       Politics of citizenship in Indonesia (EH)

14.45 – 15.15     Coffee/Tea break

15.15 – 17.00     Brief presentations of the participants’ research projects

 

 

Tuesday 19 May 2015 – Mobility, Belonging and Active Citizenship

10.15 – 11.00     Introduction: Conceptualising citizenship in the context of mobility (Marta Bivand Erdal and Cathrine Brun)

11.15 – 11.45     Transnational ties, diaspora engagements and citizenship (MBE)

11.45 – 12.45     Lunch

12.45 – 13.15     Citizenship and diversity in immigration contexts (MBE)

13.30 – 14.00     Displacement, humanitarian status and citizenship (CB)

14.00 – 14.45     Discussion

14.45 – 15.15     Coffee/Tea break

                              15.15 – 17.00    Project presentations and discussions

 

Wednesday 20 May 2015 – Contentious Politics, Democracy and Citizenship

10.15 – 12.00     Contentious politics, spatiality and radical democracy (Kristian Stokke)

12.00 – 13.00     Lunch

13.00 – 14.45     Politics, citizenship and contention in carbon society (Håvard Haarstad)

14.45 – 15.15     Coffee/Tea break

15.15 – 16.00     Environmental justice and citizenship (MH)

16.15 - 17.00     Project presentations and discussions

 

Thursday 21 May 2015 – Workers, Representation and Urban Citizenship

10.15 – 12.00     Citizenship at work? Migrant workers in hospitality workplaces (David Jordhus-Lier)

12.00 – 13.00     Lunch

13.00 – 14.45     Citizenship across the rural-urban divide: Discursive struggle over workers’ collective identity (Marielle Stigum Gleiss)

14.45 – 15.15     Coffee/Tea break

15.15 – 17.00     Project presentations and discussions

 

Friday 22 May 2015 – Researching Political Geographies of Citizenship

10.15 – 12.00     Summing up and ways forward / Project presentations and discussions

12.00 – 13.00     Lunch

13.00 – 14.45     Topics for Course Papers (Kristian Stokke)

14.45 – 15.15     Coffee/Tea break

15.15 – 16.00     Course evaluation

 

 

Lecturers:

Kristian Stokke, Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo

Marta Bivand Erdal, Peace Research Institute Oslo

Cathrine Brun, Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Håvard Haarstad, Department of Geography, University of Bergen

David Jordhus-Lier, Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo

Marielle Stigum Gleiss, Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo

Eric Hiariej, Department of International Relations, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia

Maharani Hapsari, Department of International Relations, Universitas Gadjah mada, Indonesia

 

For questions regarding the course, please contact Prof. Kristian Stokke, kristian.stokke@sgeo.uio.no, phone no +47 22855242.

 

 

Readings

(For Dropbox access please contact kristian.stokke@sosgeo.uio.no)

 

Monday 18 May: Conceptualizing Citizenship Geographically

This session seeks to outline key terms, approaches and changes in citizenship studies, discuss key concept of spatiality and their relevance for citizenship studies, and identify key characteristics and dynamics in citizenship politics. The first lecture starts out from an identification of four key dimensions of citizenship: membership, legal status, rights and participation. This is followed by a discussion of a twofold transformation within the conventional model of citizenship and in citizenship studies: a cultural turn from universal rights towards a focus on difference and group-differentiated rights; and a global turn from national towards post-national, denationalized and transnational citizenship.  The second lecture discusses popular politics of citizenship with special attention to two interrelated dimensions of citizenship politics: politics of membership around the construction of political communities and recognition of cultural differences, and politics of rights around substantial rights and political representation. The meaning and relevance of spatiality is foregrounded throughout these two lectures.

 

Readings:

Stokke, K. (2013). Conceptualizing the Politics of Citizenship. PCD Journal, 5. (25 pages)

Isin, E. F., & Wood, P. K. (1999). Citizenship & Identity. London: Sage Publications. (Chapters 1-2, 45 pages)

Joppke, C. (2008). Transformation of Citizenship: Status, Rights, Identity. In E. F. Isin & B. S. Turner (Eds.), Citizenship between Past and Future. London: Routledge. (12 pages)

Brodie, J. (2008). The Social in Citizenship. In E. F. Isin (Ed.), Recasting the Social in Citizenship. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. (24 pages)

Young, I. M. (1998). Polity and Group Difference: A Critique of the Ideal of Universal Citizenship. In G. Shafir (Ed.), The Citizenship Debates. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. (28 pages)

Kymlicka, W. (1998). Multicultural Citizenship. In G. Shafir (Ed.), The Citizenship Debates. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. (22 pages)

Juteau, D. (2008). Multicultural Citizenship beyond Recognition. In E. F. Isin (Ed.), Recasting the Social in Citizenship. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. (30 pages)

Sassen, S. (2002). Towards Post-National and Denationalized Citizenship. In E. F. Isin & B. S. Turner (Eds.), Handbook of Citizenship Studies. London: Sage. (15 pages)

Desforges, L., Jones, R., & Woods, M. (2005). New Geographies of Citizenship. Citizenship Studies, 9(5), 439-451. (13 pages)

Schlenkera, A., & Blattera, J. (2014). Conceptualizing and evaluating (new) forms of citizenship between nationalism and cosmopolitanism. Democratization, 21(6), 1091-1116. (26 pages)

Robins, S., Cornwall, A., & von Lieres, B. (2008). Rethinking 'Citizenship' in the Postcolony. Third World Quarterly, 29(6), 1069-1086. (18 pages)

Painter, J. (2008). European Citizenship and the Regions. European Urban and Regional Studies, 15(1), 5-19. (15 pages)

Jessop, B., Brenner, N., & Jones, M. (2008). Theorizing sociospatial relations. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 26, 389-401. (13 pages)

 

 

Tuesday 19 May: Mobility, Belonging and Active Citizenship

In this session, we would like to jointly and with examples from our own research discuss the various relationships, connections, tensions and alternative practices of citizenship that emerge from mobility at different scales, and subsequent changing notions of membership and belonging which this may lead to. In the introduction we provide an overview of some of the main themes that have emerged over the past 20 years in studies on citizenship, mobility and belonging. We then move on to examples which show how such debates are relevant in relation to emigration states, contexts of immigration, transnational and diaspora relations, as well as in humanitarian contexts of displacement, drawing on empirical examples.

 

Readings (may be revised closer to the date of the PhD course):

Bauder, H. (2013). Domicile citizenship, human mobility and territoriality. Progress in Human Geography: 1-16.

Brun, C. (2003). Local citizens or internally displaced persons? Dilemmas of long term displacement in Sri Lanka. Journal of Refugee Studies 16(4): 376-397.

Brun, C. (2010). Hospitality: becoming ‘IDPs’ and ‘hosts’ in protracted displacement. Journal of Refugee Studies 23(3): 337–355.

Collyer, M. (2006). Transnational political participation of Algerian migrants: A civil society abroad? Political Geography 25(7): 836-49.

Collyer, M. (2013). Introduction: Locating and narrating emigration nations. In M. Collyer (Ed.), Emigration nations: Policies and ideologies of emigrant engagement. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan (pp. 1-24).

Collyer, M. & King, R. (2014). Producing transnational space: International migration and the extra-territorial reach of state power. Progress in Human Geography.

Erdal, M. B. & Oeppen, C. (2013). Migrant balancing acts: Understanding the interactions between integration and transnationalism. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 39(6): 867-84.

Fox, J. (2005). Unpacking transnational citizenship. Annual Review of Political Science 8.

Gamlen, A. (2008). The emigration state and modern geopolitical imaginations. Political Geography 27(8): 840-56.

Ho, E. E. L. (2008). Citizenship, migration and transnationalism: A review and critical interventions. Geography Compass 2(5): 1286-300.

Isin,  E. F. & Rygiel, K. (2007). Abject Spaces: frontiers, zones, camps. In E. Dauphinee & C. Masters (Eds.), Logics of Biopower and the War on Terror. Houndmills: Palgrave. (pp. 181 – 203)

Isin, E. & Wood, P. (1999). Citizenship and Identity. London: Sage.

Joppke, C. (1999). How immigration is changing citizenship: A comparative view. Ethnic and Racial Studies 22(4): 629-52.

Leitner, H. & Ehrkamp, P. (2006). Transnationalism and migrants' imaginings of citizenship. Environment and Planning A, 38(9):1615-32.

Leitner, H. & Strunk, C. (2014). Spaces of immigrant advocacy and liberal democratic citizenship. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 104(2): 348-56.

Mügge, L. (2013). Ideologies of nationhood in sending-state transnationalism: Comparing Surinam and Turkey. Ethnicities 13(3): 338-58.

Owens, P. (). Reclaiming bare life? Against Agamben on Refugees. International Relations 23(4): 567–582.

Sejersen, T. B. (2008). “I vow to thee my countries” – the expansion of dual citizenship in the 21st century. International Migration Review 42(3): 523-49.

Smith, M. P. (2005). Transnational urbanism revisited. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 31(2): 235-44.

Soysal, Y. (1994). Limits of citizenship. Migrants and membership in Europe. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Staeheli, L. A. (2008). Citizenship and the problem of community. Political Geography 27(1): 5-21.

Staeheli, L. A. (2010). Political geography: Where's citizenship? Progress in Human Geography 35(3): 393-400.

Staeheli, L. A.; Ehrkamp, P.; Leitner, H. & Nagel, C. R. (2012). Dreaming the ordinary: Daily life and the complex geographies of citizenship. Progress in Human Geography 36(5): 628-44.

Staeheli, L. A. & Nagel, C. R. (2006). Topographies of home and citizenship: Arab-American activists in the United States. Environment and Planning A 38: 1599-614.

Waite, L. (2012). Neo-assimilationist citizenship and belonging policies in Britain: Meanings for transnational migrants in Northern England. Geoforum 43(2): 353-61.

 

 

Wednesday 20 May: Contentious Politics, Democracy and Citizenship

This session examines contentious politics, especially by social movements, around inclusion in communities of citizens, citizenship rights and political participation and representation. The first lecture reviews core themes and approaches in geographical scholarship on citizenship, before turning to scholarship on social movements and radical democracy, and on transformative democratic politics. The second lecture discusses contentious politics, democracy and citizenship in the context of natural resources and energy, and how ‘carbon society’ shapes spaces for political practice.

 

Readings (Kristian Stokke’s lecture)

Leitner, H., Sheppard, E., & Sziarto, K. M. (2008). The Spatialities of Contentious Politics. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 33(2), 157-172. (16 pages)

Nicholls, W., Miller, B., & Beaumont, J. (2013). Conceptualizing the Spatialities of Social Movements. In W. Nicholls, B. Miller & J. Beaumont (Eds.), Spaces of Contention: Spatialities of Social Movements. Surrey: Ashgate. (23 pages)

Miller, B. (2013). Conclusion: Spatialities of Mobilization: Building and Breaking Relationships. In W. Nicholls, B. Miller & J. Beaumont (Eds.), Spaces of Contention: Spatialities of Social Movements. Surrey: Ashgate. (14 pages)

McFarlane, C. (2009). Translocal assemblages: Space, power and social movements. Geoforum, 40, 561-567. (7 pages)

Haarstad, H. (2007). Collective Political Subjectivity and the Problem of Scale. Contemporary Politics, 13(1), 57-74. (18 pages)

Rasmussen, C., & Brown, M. (2002). Radical Democratic Citizenship: Amidst Political Theory. In E. F. Isin & B. S. Turner (Eds.), Handbook of Citizenship Studies. London: Sage. (14 pages)

Mouffe, C. (2009). Democracy in a Multipolar World. Millenium: Journal of International Studies, 37(3), 549-561. (13 pages)

Stokke, K. (2014). Substantiating Urban Democracy: The Importance of Popular Representation and Transformative Democratic Politics. In S. Parnell & S. Oldfield (Eds.), A Routledge Handbook on Cities of the Global South. London: Routledge. (12 pages)

Bull, B. (2013). Social Movements and the 'Pink Tide' Governments in Latin America: Transformation, Inclusion and Rejection. In K. Stokke & O. Törnquist (Eds.), Democratization in the Global South: The Importance of Transformative Politics. Basingstoke: Palgrave-Macmillan. (25 pages)

Heller, P. (2013). Participation and Democratic Transformation: Building Effective Citizenship in Brazil, India and South Africa. In K. Stokke & O. Törnquist (Eds.), Democratization in the Global South: The Importance of Transformative Politics. Basingstoke: Palgrave-Macmillan. (33 pages)

 

 

Readings (Håvard Haarstad’s lecture)

Grugel, J. & Nem Singh, J. (2013). Citizenship, Democratisation and Resource Politics. In: J. Nem Singh & F. Bourgouin (Eds.), Resource Governance and Developmental States in the Global South. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 61-82. (22 pages)

Mitchell, T. (2009). Carbon Democracy. Economy and Society, 38(3): 399-432.

Haarstad, H. (2007). Collective Political Subjectivity and the problem of scale. Contemporary Politics, 13(1): 57-74. (15 pages)

Haarstad, H. (2010). Maneuvering the spaces of globalization: the rearticulation of the Bolivian labor movement. Norwegian Journal of Geography, 64(1): 9-20. (12 pages)

Haarstad, H. (Ed.) (2012). New Political Spaces in Latin American Natural Resource Governance. Chapter 1 (pp. 1-16) and chapter 12 (239-248). (26 pages)

Huber, M. (2009). The Use of Gasoline: Value, Oil, and the ”American way of life”. Antipode 41(3): 465-486. (22 pages)

Huber, M. (2012). Refined Politics: Petroleum Products, Neoliberalism, and the Ecology of Entrepreneurial Life. Journal of American Studies, 46: 295-312. (18 pages)

Latta, A. (2008). The Ecological Citizen. In E. F. Isin (Ed.), Recasting the Social in Citizenship. University of Toronto Press. (22 pages)

Urry, J. (2014). The Problem of Energy. Theory, Culture and Society, 31(5): 3-20. (18 pages)

 

 

Thursday 21 May: Workers, Representation and Urban Citizenship

In the first part of this session, we will focus on the relationship between citizenship and work in advanced post-industrial economies through the notion of industrial citizenship. We discuss how migrant subject positions challenge worker identities and claims for industrial citizenship through case studies in urban hospitality labour markets. The second lecture uses the case of internal labor migration in China to discuss two dimensions of the political geographies of citizenship: first, how the rural-urban divide shapes the territoriality of rights, and, second, how membership in the sense of workers’ collective identity is not objective and given, but the site of a struggle between different discourses.

 

 

Readings (David Jordhus-Lier’s lecture)

Fudge, J. (2005). "After industrial citizenship: Market citizenship or citizenship at work?" Relations Industrielles/Industrial Relations 60(4): 631-656.

Castles, S. (2011). Migration, crisis, and the global labour market. Globalizations, 8(3): 311-324.

Alberti, G., Holgate, J., & Tapia, M. (2013). Organising migrants as workers or as migrant workers? Intersectionality, trade unions and precarious work. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 24(22): 4132-4148.

Jordhus-Lier, D., & Tufts, S. (2014). Five challenges for solidarity and representation in hospitality workplaces. ". In D. C. Jordhus-Lier & A. Underthun (Eds.), A hospitable world? Organising work and workers in hotels and tourist resorts. Routledge, pp. 213-225

Henningsen, E., Jordhus-Lier, D. C. & Underthun, A. (forthcoming). "The resort as a workplace: Seasonal workers in a Norwegian mountain municipality". In D. C. Jordhus-Lier & A. Underthun (Eds.), A hospitable world? Organising work and workers in hotels and tourist resorts. Routledge, pp. 121-136.

 

 

Readings (Marielle Stigum Gleiss’ lecture)

Zhang, L. & Wang, G. X. (2010). Urban citizenship of rural migrants in reform-era China. Citizenship Studies, 14(2): 145-166 (22 pages)

Jørgensen, M. & Phillips, L. (2002). Discourse Analysis as Theory and Method. London: SAGE, chapter 1-2 (59 pages)

          Alternative text: Torfing, J. (1999). New Theories of Discourse: Laclau, Mouffe and Zizek. Oxford: Blackwell.

Gleiss, M. S. (forthcoming). Speaking up for the suffering (br)other: Weibo activism, discursive struggles, and minimal politics in China. Media, Culture & Society. Available as Online First on http://mcs.sagepub.com/content/early/2015/02/07/0163443714566897.full (17 pages)

Gleiss, M. S. From Being a Problem to Having Problems: Discourse, Governmentality and Chinese Migrant Workers. Unpublished manuscript, will be made available to course participants. (28 pages)

Examination

This is a 5-day theory-course, 6 ECTS. Each participant is requested to send in a one-page description of her/his Ph.D.-project (aim, research questions and methodological approaches), one week before the start of the course, on 11th May 2015. Requested readings consist of approximately 1000 pages (a detailed reading list will be made available before the course). Attendance and active participation is expected throughout the course. Examination will be in the form of a written paper (10-15 pages) on a topic agreed upon with the course coordinator (Kristian Stokke). The deadline for handing in the paper is 3rd July. The paper should be sent to Katalin Godberg by email to: katalin.godberg@sosgeo.uio.no

Grading scale

Grades are awarded on a pass/fail scale. Read more about the grading system.

Facts about this course

Credits

6

Level

PhD

Teaching

Spring 2015

18-22th May 2015

Examination

Spring 2015

Teaching language

English