HIS4318 – Teddy Roosevelt to Trump: History of US Presidential Elections since 1912

Schedule, syllabus and examination date

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Course content

In 1912, the United States was an ascendant industrial power with a large agricultural base, modest in military reach; voting was limited to white men, and society was cleft along hierarchical lines of race and ethnicity. In 2016, it is the world’s sole military superpower, global in its reach, with a society primarily composed of metropolitan centers and an economy led by a tertiary sector and an industrial base beset by tough international challenges; the right to vote is less restricted but not always widely exercised, and society is most rigidly divided by wealth, culture a product of mass-mediated ethnic intermixing. How have the bases and methods of political organization and competition changed—or not changed—amid these transformations?

This is a course in US political history that focuses on key presidential campaigns and elections, starting with 1912 and taking matters up to the present day. You will read detailed accounts of key campaigns and elections. These accounts will inform you of the bases of partisan identity and competition during several important eras in the twentieth-century United States. We will depart from the campaign events defined narrowly to explore the policies and issues that shaped and propelled political debate in the United States during the past century. From the political-media colossus of Teddy Roosevelt to that of Donald Trump, we will mark the distance traveled by US politics.

Learning outcome

A student who successfully completes this course should be able to:

  • explain how different partisan coalitions competed for power democratically in US elections between 1912 and the present.
  • discuss how election outcomes both empowered and limited policy and political results from 1912 to the present.
  • outline the changing directions and content of political competition at the highest levels in the US from 1912 to the present.

Admission

Students who are admitted to study programmes at UiO must each semester register which courses and exams they wish to sign up for in Studentweb.

If you are not already enrolled as a student at UiO, please see our information about admission requirements and procedures.

This course is only available to MA-students. If you are a BA-student, please see HIS2318 – Teddy Roosevelt to Trump: History of US Presidential Elections since 1912

Teaching

This course will combine lectures with seminars. Please read the material assigned for the relevant week before that week’s class meetings, so that you will be in a position to answer questions about the reading and discuss it at that time.

Master degree students in HIS4318 will attend meetings of HIS2318, and additional meetings of the master degree candidates with the instructor will be scheduled.

 

Examination

Semester paper:

  • Graded work will consist of a paper
  • approximately 6-8 pages in length (double-spaced)
  • The paper is to be submitted through Canvas at the semester’s end.
  • The file must be submitted in .pdf-format and we stress that the student is responsible for making sure that the files are readable. If you need assistance in converting your file into .pdf, we recommend that you follow these instructions.
  • The file must be named with your candidate number (not your name) and the course code (HIS2318).
  • More information will be given in class.

Use of sources and citation

You should familiarize yourself with the rules that apply to the use of sources and citations. If you violate the rules, you may be suspected of cheating/attempted cheating.

Language of examination

The examination text is given in English, and you submit your response in English.

Grading scale

Grades are awarded on a scale from A to F, where A is the best grade and F is a fail. Read more about the grading system.

Explanations and appeals

Resit an examination

Special examination arrangements

Application form, deadline and requirements for special examination arrangements.

Evaluation

The course is subject to continuous evaluation. At regular intervals we also ask students to participate in a more comprehensive evaluation.

Facts about this course

Credits

10

Level

Master

Teaching

This course is offered on an irregular basis.

Teaching language

English