Dette emnet er nedlagt

Oversikt over moduler i KJM-MENA4010

Norwegian: Her finner du samtlige moduler i KJM-MENA4010. Vær oppmerksom på at de fleste modulene undervises enten vår eller høst. Dette skal stå under hver modul. Noen moduler har forkunnskapskrav og noen har begrenset kapasitet. Det må normalt være minst 3 studenter oppmeldt for at en modul skal gå.

 

English: Here you will find the complete list of modules offered for KJM-MENA4010. Please be aware that most modules are taught either fall or spring. Teaching semester should be listed under each module. Some modules have mandatory prerequisite knowledge, and some have limited capacity. There must normally be at least 3 registered students for a module to run.

Module 1: Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

Teaching semester:

Spring and fall. No available from fall 2018

Learning outcomes:

The student shall at the end of the course be able to do the following with the program TopSpin on Bruker NMR instruments: 1. Acquire and process 1H (proton), 13C (carbon), 31P (phosphorous) and 19F (fluorine) one dimensional nmr spectra.  2. Process a series of two dimensional nmr spectra (TOCY, NOESY, HSQC) in TopSpin. 3. Acquire a series of one dimensional and 2 dimensional nmr spectra with the automation program ICONNMR. 3 Understand where acquired spectra are stored and how to retrieve them. 4. Being able to optimize the magnetic field for a specific nmr sample (shimming). 5. The students shall learn how to prepare nmr samples.

The students shall be able to do all they have learned with almost no help of the teaching manuals.

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

It is recommended to have nmr knowledge similar to what is taught in KJM 3000 before registering for this module. The student must be able to operate Windows PCs before starting the course. The student must master the concepts of folders, programs and documents/files. The student must be able to map hard disks on other computers in the network.  The student must be able to copy and paste folders and documents/files from one location to another location. The student shall have rudimentary knowledge of solution state nmr spectroscopy before starting the course.  The goal of this course is practical and you shall know some nmr theory before you start this course.

General course information:

You must be healthy and not have a pacemaker running your hart, you must not have a shunt in your body and you must not have pieces of metal iron in your body. Persons who previously have been in a war zone and have pieces of iron shrapnel in the body cannot participate.  It is recommended that pregnant persons or persons attempting to become pregnant, especially in the beginning of the pregnancy, use caution when approaching the magnets.

The course starts on a Thursday morning at 09.00 AM precisely in room Ø 338 in the Chemistry Building.  Registration of who is actually present and a safety course takes place first. If a student arrives after the safety course has started that student is excluded from the course. The students are divided in groups of two or three persons. These persons will work together later in the course. Later in the day up to three hours of practical nmr lectures will take place in room Ø 316. Friday half of the students show up at 09.00 and the other half at 13.00. Monday the following week the same happens. These two days teachers will be present to teach you all the time.  You will operate nmr spectrometers and process data these days. Students will then later in the course train on spectrometers without supervision in booked slots of time. One teacher will be present in the labs all the time in the 14 day period between 0900 and 1700. On the second Friday everyone shows up at 09.00 to learn to use the automation program ICONNMR.  A one hour practical exam at a spectrometer ends the course. Grading: Pass or fail.

 

Module 2: Electrical measurements

Teaching semester:

Fall. From 2017: Spring

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

Semester specific course information(link)

 

 

Module 4: Preparation and testing of micro-LC columns

Teaching semester:

Fall

Learning outcomes: See below

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

You must have taken KJM3400 or KJM4420/KJM3420 (or an equivalent course) to participate in this module.

General course information:

Literature to read:

Chapters 4.1, 4.2 og 5 i J.P.C. in Vissers Ph.D. thesis. Ca. 50 pages. (A copy will be provided at the lecture.)

Laboratory exercises and evaluation:

Firstly, the student must perform a column packing under supervision as described in the SOP for the column packing instrumentation. Secondly, the student must by him/herself pack one (at least) properly packed column. The student must be able to find the most appropriate equipment and material for the column packing, and put together the equipment by him/herself. The student must be able to make a justified choice of filters, unions, ferrules, fused silica capillaries, packing material, slurry medium, and packing pressure, and will be tested for his/her knowledge of  this at the end of the module. The column made by the student will be tested in a standard micro-LC system, and to get the column and module accepted, the column must have an efficiency which is better than 40 000 plates/m. Additionally, a 1-3 pages report, which includes the N per meter value of the column, must be written and approved to pass the module.

semester specific course information (link)

 

 

 

Module 7: Micro-LC-UV

Teaching semester:

Fall

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

You must have taken KJM3400 or KJM4420/KJM3420 (or an equivalent course) to participate in this module.

General course information:

Literature to read:

The following articles must be read:

Vissers, Johannes P. C.; A. Claessens, Henk; Cramers, Carel A. Microcolumn liquid chromatography: instrumentation, detection and applications. Journal of Chromatography A (1997), 779(1 + 2), 1-28.

Vissers, J. P. C. Recent developments in microcolumn liquid chromatography. Journal of Chromatography A (1999), 856(1 + 2), 117-143

Chervet, J. P.; Ursem, M.; Salzmann, J. P. Instrumental Requirements for Nanoscale Liquid Chromatography. Analytical Chemistry (1996), 68(9), 1507-1512

Laboratory exercises and evaluation:

The studenten will use a micro-LC system consisting of a pump with a solvent reservoir, a micro injector, a micro column and a UV detector with ”on-capillary” flow cell. Firstly, the system must be tested with a test mixture which is provided. Totalchrom software will be used for data collection. Secondly, a new test mixture will be provided to the student who must develop an analysis method for separation of the compounds in the test mixture. To get the module accepted the student must find the separation conditions and perform the separation. The student must obtain enough knowledge of the Totalchrom software to be able to store chromatograms, to reanalyse chromatograms and to transfer the chromatograms to Word documents. Chromatogram(s) showing sufficient separation must be presented in the written report. At the end of the module, the student will be examined with regard to choosing capillary dimensions, mobile phases, mobile phase flow rates, sample volumes etc., and in the knowledge of the chromatography software used. The student is expected to know the subject to the extent that he/she is able to make new methods, to save, reanalyse and transfer chromatograms to Word documents. Additionally, a 1-2 pages report must be written and approved to pass the module.

Semester specific course information (link)

 

Module 8: Kvantekjemiske metoder

Teaching semester:

Spring

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

Semester specific course information(link)

 

Module 9: XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy)

Teaching semester:

Fall. Most likely schedule: Weeks 42-44

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

This module is meant to introduce the students to the instrumentation and theory of XPS, the most widely used method in surface analysis. It will contain theory and application within a framework that includes a problem solving approach to complex real world systems. The course is divided into: formal lecture material, teamwork based problem set assignments, laboratory work and off line data processing

Material to be covered:

• Instrumentation.

• Basic theory for X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

• Applications: thin films, catalysis, corrosion, adhesion, semiconductors polymers, photovoltaics, fuel cells are some indicative material fields.

Teachers:

Spyros Diplas  Spyros.Diplas@sintef.no and Sissel Jørgensen  sisselj@kjemi.uio.no

Curriculum:

Lecture notes

Auger- and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy in Materials Science, Siegfried Hofmann

Exercises and tests

CasaXPS

Everything is posted in Fronter

Evaluation: Passed/failed based upon written laboratory reports.

Laboratory work: This will be done in collaboration with SINTEF.

Useful References:

• 1. Surface Analysis by Auger and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Edited by D. Briggs and J.T. Grant

• 2. An Introduction to Surface Analysis by XPS and AES by JohnF. Watts & John Wolstenholme (if you can get hold of it)

• 3. Practical Surface Analysis, vol. 1 - Auger and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Edited by D. Briggs and M.P. Seah

•4. http://www.chem.qmul.ac.uk/surfaces/scc/

• 5. http://www.casaxps.com/ebooks/XPS%20AES%20Book%20new%20margins%20rev%201.2%20for%20web.pdf

Semester specific course information (link)

 

Module 11: Micro-LC column-switching systems

Teaching semester:

Fall

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

You must have taken KJM3400 or KJM4420/KJM3420 (or an equivalent course) to participate in this module. To be able to take this module, you must have taken module no. 7.

General course information:

Literature to read:

Evans, Charles R.; Jorgenson, James W.. Multidimensional LC-LC and LC-CE for high-resolution separations of biological molecules. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (2004), 378, 1952-1957(NB)

Pitarch, Elena; Hernandez, Felix; ten Hove, Jan; Meiring, Hugo; Niesing, Willem; Dijkman, Ellen; Stolker, Linda; Hogendoorn, Elbert. Potential of capillary-column-switching liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the quantitative trace analysis of small molecules. Application to the on-line screening of drugs in water. Journal of Chromatography, A (2004), 1031, 1-9

Holm,A; Large volume injection in capillary LC (part of PhD thesis 2004) - a copy will be provided at the lecture.

Holm, A.; Molander, P.; Lundanes, E.; Greibrokk, T. Determination of rotenone in river water utilizing packed capillary column switching liquid chromatography with UV and time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection. Journal of Chromatography, A (2003), 983, 43-50.

Holm, Anders; Molander, Paal; Lundanes, Elsa; Ovrebo, Steinar; Greibrokk, Tyge. Fast and sensitive determination of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene by packed capillary column switching liquid chromatography coupled to micro-electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Journal of Chromatography, B: Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences (2003), 794, 175-183.

Holm, Anders; Solbu, Kasper; Molander, Paal; Lundanes, Elsa; Greibrokk, Tyge. Sensitive biomonitoring of phthalate metabolites in human urine using packed capillary column switching liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (2004), 378, 1762-1768.

Laboratory exercises and evaluation:

The supervisor will show the student the set-up of a micro column switching with UV deteksjon. The student will under supervison test the system using a test mixture of compounds and the conditions provided by the supervisor (method 1). Thereafter, the student is given a new test mixture, and the student must find the appropriate conditons to focus the componds on the precolumn and separate the compounds on the analytical column. To pass the module, the student must show that the method can be used to inject up to 500 µL without breakthrough and without loss in efficiency (compared with the efficiency found in method 1). The repeatability of retention times and peak area must be better than 3% RSD (n > 3). At the end of the module, the student will be examined with regard to choosing capillary dimensions, stationary phases, mobile phases and injection volume and other theoretical subjects, to control that the student can relate theoretical and practical knowledge. Additionally, a 1-2 pages report must be written and approved to pass the module.

 

Semester specific course information (link)

 

Module 13: Powder diffraction X-ray

Teaching semester:

Spring

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

Semester specific course information(link)

 

 

Module 14: Contact angles and surface energy of solid substances

Teaching semester:

Spring and fall. !!! The module was not given Spring 2016 and Fall 2016.

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

Semester specific course information(link)

 

 

Module 15: Micro-LC-MS

Teaching semester:

Fall

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

You must have taken KJM3400 or KJM4420/KJM3420 (or an equivalent course) to participate in this module. To be able to take this module, you must also have taken module no. 7.

General course information:

Literature to read:

Chapter. 3 (Fundamental mass spectrometry) in the book "Protein sequencing and identification using tandem mass spectrometry" by Michael Kinter og Nicholas E. Sherman, Wiley, 2000.

Abian, J.; Oosterkamp, A. J.; Gelpi, E. Comparison of conventional, narrow-bore and capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: practical considerations. Journal of Mass Spectrometry (1999), 34, 244-254

Zimmer, D.. Introduction to quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Chromatographia (2003), 57(Suppl.), S/325-S/332.

Capiello, A., Famiglini, G., Palma P., Trufelli, H. Matrix effects in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Journal of Liquid Chromatography & Related Technologies (2010), 33, 1067-1081.

Additionally you may have a look at:

Smyth, W. Franklin; Brooks, Peter. A critical evaluation of high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis-electrospray-mass spectrometry for the detection and determination of small molecules of significance in clinical and forensic science. Electrophoresis (2004), 25(10-11), 1413-1446.

Laboratory exercises and evaluation:

The supervisor will show and explain the features of the micro-LC system coupled to an electrospray MS instrument (TOF instrument). Introduction to MassLynx software,and washing and maintenance of ESI, will be given. Thereafter the student must make a gradient method, which separates the compounds and give good response in the MS, for determination of test compounds which are provided. To pass the module the student must show TIC and RIC chromatograms of the separation and mass spectra of the compounds provided. At the end of the module, the student will be examined with regard to choosing mobile phases and MS parameters, and in the knowledge of the MS instrument and ability to transfer data to Word documents. Additionally, a 1-2 pages report must be written and approved to pass the module.

Semester specific course information(link)

 

Module 16: Diffusion of fluids within porous materials, NMR part II

Teaching semester:

Spring

Learning outcomes:

Studenten skal utføre diffusjon- og relaksasjonstidsmålinger på vann innesluttet i et porøst materiale med et lav-felt NMR instrument (see page 9). Med bakgrunn i enkel teori skal overflatearealet i det porøse materialet bestemmes og graden av vekselvirkning mellom vannet og den porøse overflaten diskuteres.

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

Emnet gir en praktisk (og teoretisk) innføring i hvordan bestemme diffusjon av væsker innesluttet i porøse materialer med NMR.

Semester specific course information(link)

 

Module 17: Surface tension measurements with pendant and sessile drop

Teaching semester:

Spring. !!! From spring 2016 the module will not be offered until further notice.!!!

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

Semester specific course information(link)

 

Module 18: Single crystal X-ray diffraction

Teaching semester:

Spring

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

Semester specific course information(link)

Module 19: Analysis/fractionation and speciation of water samples

Teaching semester:

Fall

Learning outcomes:

  • The student is expected to:
  • Understand how the Health Safety and Environment (HSE) regime is practiced at the Group of Environmental Analysis
  • Acquire experience of water sampling from various compartments through the watershed
  • Understand the difference between total analysis, fractions and species
  • Understand the concept of multiple simultaneous equilibriums
  • Understand the basic principles of mobility and toxicity of chemical species
  • Learn how to conduct an Al-fractionation and have experience from the analysis of major anions and cations
  • Be able to run the MINEQL+ programme
  • Relate to environmental monitoring data and to write a report where data are evaluated and interpreted.

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

The module introduces the student to:

  • Sampling strategies
  • Fieldwork with regional sampling of surface waters in the Oslo region
  • HSE regime at the group of Environmental Analysis
  • Sample pretreatment for analysis of major anions and cations
  • Chemical analysis of key environmental parameters and data quality control
  • Difference between total analysis, fractionation and speciation
  • Calculations of species in natural freshwaters using speciation programs

For more detailed information see:

http://www.uio.no/studier/emner/matnat/kjemi/KJM-MENA4010/h14/moduler/modul-19/analyser_fraksjonering_vannprover.html

Semester specific course information(link)

 

Modul 20: Dekomponering i mikrobølgeovn

Teaching semester:

Fall. No available from Fall 2018!

Learning outcomes:

After the approved module, you should be able to find the best conditions and perform decomposition of various materials in microwave oven as pre-treatment for determination of trace elements using atomic spectrometric methods. This involves knowledge of instrument (hardware and software of the microwave oven), operation principle, acid properties, safety aspects and quality control.

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

You must have taken KJM2400 (or an equivalent course) to participate in this module.

General course information:

Content of the practical work

The supervisor will explain the function of the various part of the microwave oven (hardware and software) and demonstrate a decomposition method. Thereafter, the students should suggest a suitable decomposition method and perform decomposition for a given sample.

Literature to read (provided at lecture or found in Fronter):

  • “The art and science of microwave sample preparation for trace and ultra-trace elemental analysis” (Ch. 2 in “Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry”, Ed. A. Montaser)
  • “Guidelines for microwave acid digestion” (Ethos 900 User manual), p.1-9
  • Slides from lecture (to be found in Fronter)

Evaluation

Requirements to get the module approved:

  • participate in all parts of the module
  • master the practical work
  • deliver the report within the given deadline
  • approved report

Semester specific course information(link)

 

Module 24: Indcutively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

Teaching semester:

Spring. No available from Spring 2018!

Learning outcomes:

After the approved module the student should be able to do some simple ICP-OES method development and (under supervision) operate ICP-OES for determination of multi-elements which involve knowledge of: instrument hardware, software and operation principle; simple trouble-shooting and simple maintenance; determination of limit of detection (LOD); preparation of multi-element standards; quality control principles

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

You must have passed KJM3400 or an equivalent course that covers ICP-AES.

General course information:

Content of the practical work

The supervisor will demonstrate a method development and analyses on the ICP-OES. Then the student will be given a task to develop a method (mainly find the most suitable wavelengths to be used) for some analytes in a selected sample. All students make their own calibration solutions and prepare a sample. The limit of detection should also be determined for the analytes.

Literature to read

C.B. Boss and K.J. Fredeen, Concepts, Instrumentation and  Techniques in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry, Perkin-Elmer, 3rd ed. 2004 Ch. 2, 3, 4 and 5  

Recommended for those that are going to use the instrument in their master work:

Joachim Nölte: ICP Emission Spectrometry. A Practical Guide

Chapter 4: Method Development (p100-168)

Schedule:

The module starts with a lecture on Thursday the week before the practical work. The practical work will go on during the next 2-4 weeks depending on the number of participants. Finally, there will be a summary meeting.

Evaluation:

Requirements to get the module approved:

  • participate in all parts of the module
  • master the practical work
  • deliver the report within the given deadline
  • approved report

Semester specific course information(link)

 

Module 25: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

Teaching semester:

Fall. No available from Fall 2018.

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

  • The module covers:
  • SEM structure, alignment and operation
  • Source of signals and signal interpretation
  • Effect of the involved parameters and how to optimize them
  • Sample preparation
  • Imaging non-conducting samples
  • Element analysis

The curriculum for the module will primarily be based on the contents of the given lectures. Some suggested further reading on the subject is "Microstructural Characterization of Materials" by Brandon and Kaplan.

Semester specific course information(link)

 

Module 27: Radiation protection

Teaching semester:

Spring (May) in English

Fall (Jan/Feb) in Norwegian

Learning outcomes:

You will acquire a fundamental understanding of radiation protection principles. In additional you will get about two days of hands-on training about working with radioactive material.

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

KJM3900 (Radioactivity and radiochemistry) or similar is strongly recommended. The course is only intended for students who will work with radioactive material during their MSc project.

General course information:

The course consists of two parts:

  • Part A: 3-day general course in radiation protection.
  • Part B: 2-days on-site training in radiation protection procedures at the Nuclear Chemistry Section

Part A is taught simultaneously as the general radiation protection EHS-course (see http://stralevernkurs.no for more information and dates).

You will learn about the following topics:

  • How radiation interacts with its surroundings
  • Radiation dose
  • Detection of radiation and radiation dose
  • How to protect yourself and others
  • Handling of radioactive waste
  • Laws, regulations and procedures

The course is given at the Nuclear Chemistry Section at the Department of Chemistry in the Chemistry building at Blindern campus (street address Sem Sælands vei 26).

All course material will be provided, but you should bring a "scientific" calculator if you have one (i.e. with logarithmic and exponential functions). Participants from UiO (employees or students) should bring their own radiation badges ("dosimeter"), if they have been issued with one. Those without radiation badges will be provided with guest radiation-badges.

We will not handle high amount of radiation during the course and you will not be exposed to any high-level radiation field. Thus, if you should happen to be pregnant, or just a little worried about radiation, you need not worry.

Semester specific course information(link)

 

Module 28: Gamma-spektroskopi/Gamma spectroscopy

Teaching semester:

Spring. No available from Spring 2017 

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

Semester specific course information(link)

 

Module 30: HMS and laboratory safety

Teaching semester:

Spring and fall. Not available from Spring 2018.

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

Semester specific course information(link)

 

Module 31: Statistisk forsøksplanlegging/ statistical research planning

Teaching semester:

Fall. No available from Fall 2016!

Learning outcomes:

Formal or recommended prerequisites:

General course information:

Semester specific course information(link)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publisert 5. aug. 2015 11:17 - Sist endret 5. jan. 2018 11:50